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Archives for : March2018

Delhi- Woman Molested By Doctor Inside Operation Theatre of Fortis Hospital #Vaw

Hospital authorities claimed there were no allegations of molestation in a legal notice that she sent earlier, but the woman later went to the police station and alleged she had been molested by the doctor.

NYPD Special Victims hunting for rapist of 12-year-oldThe doctor has not been arrested. (Representational Image)

A 22-year-old woman  from North- Eat has alleged that a doctor at Fortis hospital’s Vasant Kunj branch molested her inside the operation theatre during a fistulectomy procedure. Additional DCP (southwest) Monika Bhardwaj said an FIR has been registered. The doctor has not been arrested.

Hospital authorities denied the allegations, claiming that the operation took place with her consent and in the presence of two female nurses, a male anaesthetist and a male OT technician.

“The woman visited the hospital on October 16… She was found to be suffering from anal fistula,” a hospital spokesperson said. “She was advised to surgery and explained the procedure,” the hospital spokesperson said.

“He took me to OT and gave me an injection to make me unconscious, but his intention was to play with my body. He used to call me only in evening,” she said.

The police said after receiving the complaint, they have lodged a case under section 354 (molestation) of IPC against the doctor.

“The complainant is against Muneedra Gupta, the doctor who she has mentioned in the FIR. We are looking into the matter while no arrest has been made so far. She approached us on 18 February,” the police said.

Later, the woman’s lawyer sent a notice to the hospital asking them to compensate her for the procedure, the spokesperson said. Hospital authorities claimed there were no allegations of molestation in the legal notice, but the woman later went to the police station and alleged she had been molested by the doctor

 Fortis Hospital has issued a statement denying the allegations of the girl who claimed she was molested inside the operation theatre.

Delhi: Woman alleges doctor molested her, Fortis denies

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The questionable foundation of #Aadhaar

Mandatory linking of the public distribution system to Aadhaar has made access to some basic needs, especially ration, even more difficult for some
Osama Manzar
The fact that the Data Protection Bill is yet to become an Act is proof that there is no sense of urgency among government officials when it comes to keeping the data of citizens safe. Photo: Priyanka Parashar/Mint

When the idea of Aadhaar was being discussed and even when the law was approved by Parliament, Aadhaar was supposed to enable access to government schemes and entitlements for the rural and marginalised populations.

In the last two years we have seen that Aadhaar has only made access to schemes and entitlements more difficult.

In an interview to the Times of India last month, economist and social scientist Reetika Khera said, “I used to say Aadhaar is a remedy in search of a disease. Now, I say that the remedy is worse than the disease.”

I couldn’t agree more.

Our organization, Digital Empowerment Foundation, works at the grassroots level, usually in the poorest of poor districts. We see on a daily basis, how lack of information about government schemes and lack of access to the same is affecting lives. We also see how mandatory linking of the public distribution system to Aadhaar has made access to some basic needs, especially ration, even more difficult for some.

While Aadhaar was “supposed” to be a saviour, for many it has become a foe because the Aadhaar system could not accommodate for rough thumbprints or because the biometric machine could not identify them.

According to reports, by the end of October 2017, more than 500 million subscribers had already linked their phones to Aadhaar. However, if Aadhaar was supposed to facilitate access to government schemes and services, why is the government forcing linking of Aadhaar to private telcos? And who takes responsibility for this data? Are we dependent on the servers of the government or the servers of the telcos? In case of a data breach, will the government be held accountable, or the private service providers?

We must understand that the linking of Aadhaar to various personal details—including mobile number, bank account number and even health insurance—creates a digital profile of a person based on aggregated data, which can easily be misused.

Even though Section 28 of the Aadhaar Act promises to “protect” your data and “ensure confidentiality of identity information and authentication records of individuals”, this data is at great risk, especially in the absence of a proper data protection law.

The fact that the data protection bill is yet to become an Act is proof that there is no sense of urgency among government officials when it comes to keeping the data of citizens safe.

This lack of urgency can further be proved by the provision of the new e-Aadhaar password, which is a combination of the first four letters of a person’s name and his/her year of birth. Both of these are easily known by our friends, families, colleagues, acquaintances and often strangers or security guards who want to confirm our identity before letting us into an office, building, bar, theatre or the airport.

This means, anybody who knows my name and year of birth, can easily access my e-Aadhaar and even potentially misuse it.

With the citizens being forced to link their Aadhaar IDs to more and more public and private services, the government is only putting personal information of the citizens in jeopardy without a proper mechanism for either synchronization of data or protection of this aggregated data.

If Aadhaar is what it claims to be—a means “to provide for good governance, efficient, transparent and targeted delivery of subsidies, benefits and services”, why is the Unique Identification Authority of India (UIDAI) making citizens link it to private service providers? How does it help in the targeted delivery of government services and subsidies?

The government must realise that Aadhaar, in its current form—in which citizens are being left with little choice regarding whether or not they want an Aadhaar and whether or not they should link it to various public and private services—in the absence of proper digital infrastructure and security mechanisms, is a model that fails its citizens.

Osama Manzar is founder-director of Digital Empowerment Foundation and chair of Manthan and mBillionth awards. He is member, advisory board, at Alliance for Affordable Internet and has co-authored [email protected]–15 Years of Internet in India and Internet Economy of IndiaHe tweets @osamamanzar.

http://www.livemint.com/Opinion/N4giOeHMkcl5QiK6VGTpAL/The-questionable-foundation-of-Aadhaar.html

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Haryana – Aadhaar not must for treatment

Chandhigarh: The Haryana government has directed all civil surgeons, principal medical officers and medical superintendents to make sure treatment is not delayed or denied to any patient who does not have Aadhaar card or any other identity card.

Director general, health services Dr Satish Kumar Aggarwal said they must first provide immediate treatment to patients coming to hospital in serious condition and tackle file work meant for records later. He warned of disciplinary action against those who don’t comply with orders. Aadhaar card is not compulsory for patients in need of treatment in state hospitals, he said.

The decision came after two incidents of patients being refused medical assistance in the absence of Aadhaar card were reported. The first case was that of a pregnant woman refused admittance in the labour ward of a Gurugram hospital for not having an Aadhaar card. She delivered a baby outside the emergency ward.

This was followed by another pregnant woman refused medical assistance in the absence of an Aadhaar card in Ambala civil hospital. She also delivered her baby on the hospital premises.

After these cases, state health minister Anil Vij assured that treatment would not be denied to any patient in the absence of Aadhaar card.

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Gauri Lankesh murder : Hindu Yuva Sena man held in Karnataka

Gauri Lankesh murder case: K T Naveen Kumar, 37, who was arrested on February 18 by the Bengaluru police for illegal possession of bullets, has been named as the first accused in the case.

by Johnson T A | Bengaluru |

gauri lankesh, gauri lankesh murder case, gauri lankesh sit probe, kt naveen kumar, gauri lankesh arrest, journalist gauri lankeshGauri Lankesh murder case: When Kumar was produced before the court of an additional chief metropolitan magistrate, the SIT gave the court a sealed copy of a confession statement given by him about his involvement in the murder. (File)A Special Investigation Team (SIT) probing the September 5, 2017 killing of journalist-activist Gauri Lankesh, 55, carried out its first arrest in the case on Friday. K T Naveen Kumar, 37, who was arrested on February 18 by the Bengaluru Police for illegal possession of bullets, has been named as the first accused in the case.

The SIT arrested Kumar, a resident of Maddur in Mandya, after informing a magistrate’s court in Bengaluru that it had found evidence of his involvement in the Gauri Lankesh murder in the course of the investigation into the illegal arms case for which he was arrested on February 18.

The SIT initially sought a warrant for Kumar’s arrest in the Gauri Lankesh case — shortly after he was remanded in judicial custody in the illegal arms case — citing voluntary statements given by some of Kumar’s friends about his links to the Gauri Lankesh murder.

When Kumar was produced before the court of an additional chief metropolitan magistrate, the SIT gave the court a sealed copy of a confession statement given by him about his involvement in the murder. An assistant public prosecutor, Nirmala Rani, presented a remand plea to the court seeking police custody of Kumar for eight days in order to unearth the larger conspiracy and materials used in the crime.

“At present, only one accused has been named. Others will be added after investigations. This suspect was traced on the basis of CCTV footage,” said Rani. Kumar was arrested under the jurisdiction of the Upparpet police station in west Bengaluru on February 18 based on a complaint filed by a crime branch official stating that he was caught with bullets in the city bus stand.

The investigations in the Upparpet case show that Kumar, during conversations about guns and ammunition with some of his friends from Maddur, had alluded to his links to the murder of Gauri Lankesh. SIT officials have already questioned Kumar on a few occasions since his arrest on February 18.

Investigations have shown that Kumar is linked to a radical Hindutva outfit called the Hindu Yuva Sena and that he is also allegedly linked to members of the Sanatan Sanstha outfit and its affiliate the Hindu Janajagruti Samiti. He has been found in possession of more than 15 rounds of the cartridges of the .32 calibre, which are the same as the 7.65 mm cartridges.

Gauri Lankesh was shot with a 7.65 mm country-made pistol in the driveway of her home in west Bengaluru on the evening of September 5, 2017 by an unidentified man wearing a helmet. The suspect who rode the getaway motorcycle was also unidentified.

Investigations by the SIT has unearthed CCTV footage of a man conducting a recce of the journalist’s home a few hours ahead of her killing. The physical structure of the man found conducting the recce in the CCTV footage has a close resemblance to that of Kumar.

A forensic analysis of four empty cartridges and the four bullets fired to kill Gauri Lankesh has shown that markings on the bullets and cartridges match with markings found on the bullets and cartridges fired to kill the Kannada scholar and researcher M M Kalburgi, 77, in the northern Karnataka town of Dharwad on August 30, 2015. The forensic analysis suggests that Gauri Lankesh and scholar Kalburgi were shot with the same 7.65 mm pistol.

The findings from the comparison of the ballistic evidence from the Gauri Lankesh and Kalburgi cases adds to existing forensic evidence from the shooting of the leftist thinker Govind Pansare, 81, in Kohlapur in Maharashtra on February 16, 2015 where the exact same 7.65 mm country-made gun used in the Kalburgi murder was found to have been used.

More significantly, six months prior to the Kalburgi killing, rationalist Govind Pansare was killed in Mumbai in Maharashtra with bullets being pumped from two guns – some of these bullets match the ones used in the Lankesh and Kalburgi murders. And interestingly, the bullets from the second gun that shot at Pansare match the bullets used to kill another rationalist and anti-superstition activist Narendra Dabholkar in Maharashtra’s Pune in 2013.

The inter-twining of the ballistic evidence could help in cracking down on all the cases – especially since the modus operandi of two bike-borne gunmen accosting the victims and shooting them at point-blank range is also another pattern that runs through.

The other commonality is that they were all shot for their rationalist thoughts and activism

Since these murders are all being probed by four different agencies – the SIT for Lankesh, the Karnataka CID for Kalburgi, the Maharashtra police probing Pansare’s murder and the Central Bureau of Investigation is probing the Dabholkar killing – the coordination between the different investigations could well take longer.

But in all this, the ballistic evidence could be the most crucial.

Gauri Lankesh murder case breakthrough: Hindu Yuva Sena man held in Karnataka

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