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Rs 37 lakh spent on room President Pranab Mukherjee used just for an hour #WTFnews

By , TNN | Dec 26, 2012, 02.01 AM IST

Rs 37 lakh spent on room President Pranab Mukherjee used just for an hour
The government renovated the Circuit House ahead of President Pranab Mukherjee‘s visit.
BELGAUM: Rs 198 lakh of the taxpayers’ money was spent when President Pranab Mukherjeewas in Belgaum to inaugurate the Suvarna Vidhana Soudha in October.

The government renovated the circuit house(CH) ahead of President Pranab Mukherjee’s visit. It spent over Rs 161 lakh on renovation and around Rs 37 lakh on furnishing the room, where Mukherjee spent just an hour on October 11.

RTI activist Bhimappa Gadad from Mudalagi inGokak taluk sought information from the public works department on the expenditure incurred during the President’s visit.

There are two Circuit House buildings in the same compound near the central bus stand. One was inaugurated two years ago. The old building and the compound was renovated during the World Kannada Meet (WKM) held in the city last year.

This before the government spent Rs 32 lakh in 2010-11 and Rs 18 lakh in 2011-12 for renovating the circuit house.

 

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Critical Reflections on Delhi Rape Incident #Vaw

Guest post by – Neshat Quaiser

Gang-rape of a 23 year girl student in Delhi on 16th of December 2012 has produced an outburst of anger. The episode signified not only controlling sexually the woman’s body by force and damaging her physical self but more crucially it signified brutalising the body of innocence. The innocence of believing another fellow human being was brutalised. Wide sections of educated public have lost no opportunity to air their views on the issue. Vociferous insistence has been on punishment. Various forms of punishment such as capital punishment, castration – chemical or surgical, public hanging, lynching, quick justice through fast-track courts, handing over the culprits to the public, victim’s right to decide the form of punishment have been stridently suggested and demanded for the perpetrators of heinous crime. In order to provide security to women in public places various suggestions have been marshalled, of these most disturbing is the uncritical demand for the increased public presence of the police. Electronic media organisations as usual have competed with each to make a spectacle out of this display of anger predominantly by the middle class educated public.

Display of spontaneous anger is much welcomed but instead of taken-for-granted attitude it should provide an opportunity for critical reflection. But expectedly much of what have been said are commonsensical responses which have produced a thoroughly misplaced public debate reproducing the same stereotypes against which this public ostensibly intends to protest. The very intention, even without critical reflections, of the general public, however, should be welcomed at one level as it may signify transference of multi-locational anger, but what is disturbing is that even the informed educated people too have actively participated in reproducing stereotypes.

There is need to critically reflect on the whole episode. Here I will touch upon few critical questions that have been subsumed under this outburst:

Firstly, the strident demand for increased and efficient presence of the police in public spaces needs serious reflections as it would lead to further policisation of society. In the given situation an ‘efficient’ state with its organs such as police in any way is not a very good thing as it would further increase surveillance on all kinds of critical thinking and action which could conveniently be defined as threat to agenda of state and ideologically dominant groups/classes.

Secondly, there is unequivocal and one-sided emphasis on state and its organs as the lone site of the problem. State of course perpetuates violence is in many ways, but there is no mention of society’s doings. What is needed is critical reflection on ideologies that sustain relations of domination in society in which many members of this very protesting public too very actively participate. That is why much emphasis has been put by this public on the rape and quick punishment, and not on the vehement opposition and valiant fight back by the girl. It was not only a rape but also brutalising the innocence. The very fact that the girl opposed vehemently, angered the rapists, is some thing that this protesting public must pay attention to. This thinking is reflected in various forms in everyday life – in and outside home. It is the critical self-reorganisation for a humane society that alone is the answer, which would entail the critique of the state that perpetuates relations of domination in the society including gendered relations of domination.

Thirdly, there has been unequivocally vociferous demand for quick justice through a fast track court for this heinous crime. Yes, the case should not be dragged and justice should not be delayed. But the demand in the given situation is fraught with serious consequences as it would lead to bypassing the due course of law. We know that law itself is inscribed with statist agenda and crucially contributes in the construction of inverted truth. The logic of the demand for quick disposal of cases of such heinous crimes can have further serious ramifications for the religious and ethnic minorities, workers peasants and other disenfranchised sections who already are facing prejudices of all kinds by the law enforcing agencies. There has been growing demand quick disposal of Muslim terrorist case. The demand for quick justice and quick disposal of cases would further strengthen the hands of state and ideologically dominant social forces in defining what constitutes a heinous crime or anti national activities and that needs quick disposal. Such an approach would further diminish the scope of law as a domain of struggle.

Neshat Quaiser is Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi

can be contacted at [email protected]

 

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UIDAI cancels 3.84 lakh fake #Aadhaar numbers #UID #facepalm

200 px

200 px (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

 

New Delhi, December 25, 2012, HT

 

 

 

Some have managed to beat the so-called unbeatable Unique Identification (UID) system and got fake Aadhaar numbers generated raising security concerns over UPA‘s new UID based governance model.

 

 

 

 

 

lakh Aadhaar numbers of the total 4.10 lakh generated under the biometric exception clause.

 

The Aadhaar agencies are allowed to enroll people without proper finger-prints or iris under the biometric exception clause. In this, the agencies are required to provide photographs of the non-existent biometrics along with demographic details of the enrollers.

 

 

The biometric exception was incorporated to make Aadhaar truly inclusive identification generation process as there was highly level of exclusion in other systems such as ration cards. But, the agencies exploited the clause to make some pass money as for each successful enrollment and generation of Aadhaar number, the agency got Rs. 50.

 

 

It was business as usual for UIDAI till a large number of Aadhaar letters in Andhra Pradesh remained undelivered. “Most of the 45,000 undelivered Aadhaar letters in Andhra were under the exception clause. It hinted that something was wrong,” a senior UIDAI official said. Further scrutiny revealed that of 48.80 lakh Aadhaar generated in Andhra, 2.30 lakh were false and were subsequently cancelled.

 

 

With the lid blown off, similar instance cropped in other states. A Delhi government official said, who reported around 13,000 fraudulent enrollments to UIDAI, said the biometric exception was introduced for people with high level of disabilities but it was frequently used raising a question over credibility of Aadhaar numbers.

 

 

The UIDAI admitted of similar high number of fake Aadhaar numbers from Jharkhand, Maharashtra, Tamil Nadu, Tripura and Uttar Pradesh in a reply to Lok Sabha.

 

 

The authority also found of the total Aadhaar generated under this clause, only 22,195 were found to be genuine. Another 6,600 Aadhaar numbers are under investigation.

 

 

For enrollment of around 90 crore residents in subsequent phases, the UIDAI has asked agencies not to opt for biometric exception without approval from a senior, preferably a government official. The UPA govern

 

 

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#India- #Delhi- Women Helpline- 181 #Vaw #mustshare #mustcall

Three-digit number allotted for women’s helpline in Delhi

Edited by Shamik Ghosh | Updated: December 24, 2012 18:24 IST, NDTV

Three-digit number allotted for women's helpline in Delhi

New DelhiA three-digit helpline number, 181, has been allotted by the Centre to the Delhi government for its ‘office for helping women in distress.’

Delhi Chief Minister Sheila Dikshit had reportedly requested Telecom Minister Kapil Sibal for a three-digit number for the department. Usually, the ministry is short of three-digit numbers for allotment; however, this request accepted in less than two hours, according to reports.

The ministry of telecommunications has said that now it is upto the chief minister‘s office to set up the mechanism.

This comes after widespread outcry for strong police vigil on Delhi streets and tougher punishment for sexual crimes after a 23year-old medical student was gang-raped on a moving bus last Sunday.

 

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IMMEDIATE RELEASE- Statement condemning sexual violence and opposing #deathpenalty

STATEMENT BY WOMEN’S AND PROGRESSIVE GROUPS AND INDIVIDUALS CONDEMNING

SEXUAL VIOLENCE

AND

OPPOSING DEATH PENALTY

On 16 December, 2012, a 23-year old woman and her friend hailed a bus at a crossing in South Delhi. In the bus, they were both brutally attacked by a group of men who claimed to be out on a ‘joy-ride’. The woman was gang raped and the man beaten up; after several hours, they were both stripped and dumped on the road. While the young woman is still in hospital, bravely battling for her life, her friend has been discharged and is helping identify the men responsible for the heinous crime.

We, the undersigned, women’s, students’ and progressive groups and concerned citizens from around the country, are outraged at this incident and, in very strong terms, condemn her gang rape and the physical and sexual assault.

As our protests spill over to the streets all across the country, our demands for justice are strengthened by knowing that there are countless others who share this anger. We assert that rape and other forms of sexual violence are not just a women’s issue, but a political one that should concern every citizen. We strongly demand that justice is done in this and all other cases and the perpetrators are punished.

This incident is not an isolated one; sexual assault occurs with frightening regularity in this country. Adivasi and dalit women and those working in the unorganised sector, women with disabilities, hijras, kothis, trans people and sex workers are especially targeted with impunity – it is well known that the complaints of sexual assault they file are simply disregarded. We urge that the wheels of justice turn not only to incidents such as the Delhi bus case, but to the epidemic of sexual violence that threatens all of us. We need to evolve punishments that act as true deterrents to the very large number of men who commit these crimes. Our stance is not anti-punishment but against the State executing the death penalty. The fact that cases of rape have a conviction rate of as low as 26% shows that perpetrators of sexual violence enjoy a high degree of impunity, including being freed of charges.

Silent witnesses to everyday forms of sexual assault such as leering, groping, passing comments, stalking and whistling are equally responsible for rape being embedded in our culture and hence being so prevalent today. We, therefore, also condemn the culture of silence and tolerance for sexual assault and the culture of valorising this kind of violence.

We also reject voices that are ready to imprison and control women and girls under the garb of ‘safety’, instead of ensuring their freedom as equal participants in society and their right to a life free of perpetual threats of sexual assault, both inside and outside their homes.

 

In cases (like this) which have lead to a huge public outcry all across the country, and where the perpetrators have been caught, we hope that justice will be speedily served and they will be convicted for the ghastly acts that they have committed. However, our vision of this justice does not include death penalty, which is neither a deterrent nor an effective or ethical response to these acts of sexual violence. We are opposed to it for the following reasons:

1.    We recognise that every human being has a right to life. Our rage cannot give way to what are, in no uncertain terms, new cycles of violence. We refuse to deem ‘legitimate’ any act of violence that would give the State the right to take life in our names. Justice meted by the State cannot bypass complex socio-political questions of violence against women by punishing rapists by death. Death penalty is often used to distract attention away from the real issue – it changes nothing but becomes a tool in the hands of the State to further exert its power over its citizens. A huge set of changes are required in the system to end the widespread and daily culture of rape.

2.    There is no evidence to suggest that the death penalty acts as a deterrent to rape. Available data shows that there is a low rate of conviction in rape cases and a strong possibility that the death penalty would lower this conviction rate even further as it is awarded only under the ‘rarest of rare’ circumstances. The most important factor that can act as a deterrent is the certainty of punishment, rather than the severity of its form.

3.    As seen in countries like the US, men from minority communities make up a disproportionate number of death row inmates. In the context of India, a review of crimes that warrant capital punishment reveals the discriminatory way in which such laws are selectively and arbitrarily applied to disadvantaged communities, religious and ethnic minorities. This is a real and major concern, as the possibility of differential consequences for the same crime is injustice in itself.

4.    The logic of awarding death penalty to rapists is based on the belief that rape is a fate worse than death. Patriarchal notions of ‘honour’ lead us to believe that rape is the worst thing that can happen to a woman. There is a need to strongly challenge this stereotype of the ‘destroyed’ woman who loses her honour and who has no place in society after she’s been sexually assaulted. We believe that rape is tool of patriarchy, an act of violence, and has nothing to do with morality, character or behaviour.

5.    An overwhelming number of women are sexually assaulted by people known to them, and often include near or distant family, friends and partners. Who will be able to face the psychological and social trauma of having reported against their own relatives? Would marital rape (currently not recognised by law), even conceptually, ever be looked at through the same retributive prism?

6.    The State often reserves for itself the ‘right to kill’ — through the armed forces, the paramilitary and the police. We cannot forget the torture, rape and murder of ThangjamManoramaby the Assam Rifles in Manipur in 2004 or the abduction, gang rape and murder of Neelofar and Aasiya of Shopian (Kashmir) in 2009.Giving more powers to the State, whether arming the police and giving them the right to shoot at sight or awarding capital punishment, is not a viable solution to lessen the incidence of crime.
Furthermore, with death penalty at stake, the ‘guardians of the law’ will make sure that no complaints against them get registered and they will go to any length to make sure that justice does not see the light of day. The ordeal of Soni Sori, who had been tortured in police custody last year, still continues her fight from inside aprison in Chattisgarh, in spite of widespread publicity around her torture.

7.    As we know, in cases of sexual assault where the perpetrator is in a position of power (such as in cases of custodial rapeor caste and religionviolence), conviction is notoriously difficult. The death penalty, for reasons that have already been mentioned, would make conviction next to impossible.

We, the undersigned, demand the following:

  • Greater dignity, equality, autonomy and rights for women and girls from a society that should stop questioning and policing their actions at every step.
  • Immediate relief in terms of legal, medical, financial and psychological assistance and long-term rehabilitation measures must be provided to survivors of sexual assault.
  • Provision of improved infrastructure to make cities safer for women, including well-lit pavements and bus stops, help lines and emergency services.
  • Effective registration, monitoring and regulation of transport services (whether public, private or contractual) to make them safe, accessible and available to all.
  • Compulsory courses within the training curriculum on gender sensitisation for all personnel employed and engaged by the State in its various institutions, including the police.
  • That the police do its duty to ensure that public spaces are free from harassment, molestation and assault. This means that they themselves have to stop sexually assaulting women who come to make complaints. They have to register all FIRs and attend to complaints. CCTV cameras should be set up in all police stations and swift action must be taken against errant police personnel.
  • Immediate setting up of fast track courts for rape and other forms of sexual violence all across the country. State governments should operationalise their creation on a priority basis. Sentencing should be done within a period of six months.
  • The National Commission for Women has time and again proved itself to be an institution that works against the interests of women. NCW’s inability to fulfil its mandate of addressing issues of violence against women, the problematic nature of the statements made by the Chairperson and its sheer inertia in many serious situations warrants that the NCW role be reviewed and auditedas soon as possible.
  • The State acknowledges the reality of custodial violence against women in many parts of the country, especially in Kashmir, North-East and Chhattisgarh. There are several pending cases and immediate action should be taken by the government to punish the guilty and to ensure that these incidents of violence are not allowed to be repeated.
  • Regarding the Criminal Law (Amendment) Bill 2012, women’s groups have already submitted detailed recommendations to the Home Ministry. We strongly underline that the Bill must not be passed in its current form because of its many serious loopholes and lacuna. Some points:

–      There has been no amendment to the flawed definition of consent under Sec 375IPC and this has worked against the interest of justice for women.

–      The formulation of the crime of sexual assault as gender neutralmakes the identity of the perpetrator/accused also gender neutral. We demand that the definition of perpetrator be gender-specific and limited to men. Sexual violence also targets transgender people and legal reform must address this.

–      In its current form, the Bill does not recognise the structural and graded nature of sexual assault, based on concepts of hurt, harm, injury, humiliation and degradation. The Bill also does not use well-established categories of sexual assault, aggravated sexual assault and sexual offences.

–      It does not mention sexual assault by security forces as a specific category of aggravated sexual assault. We strongly recommend the inclusion of perpetration of sexual assault by security forces under Sec 376(2).

Endorsed by the following groups and individuals:

 

  • Citizens’ Collective against Sexual Assault (CCSA)
  • Purnima, Nirantar, New Delhi
  • Sandhya Gokhale, Forum Against Oppression of Women, Bombay
  • Deepti, Saheli, Delhi
  • Mary John, Centre for Women’s Development Studies (CWDS), New Delhi
  • Jagori, Delhi
  • Vimochana, Bangalore
  • Stree Mukti Sanghathan, Delhi
  • Madhya Pradesh Mahila Manch
  • Kavita Krishnan, AIPWA, New Delhi
  • Anuradha Kapoor ,Swayam, Calcutta
  • Kalpana Mehta, Manasi Swasthya Sansthan, Indore
  • Nandita Gandhi, Akshara, Bombay
  • Indira, Women against Sexual Violence and State Repression, (WSS), New Delhi
  • National Alliance of people’s Movements (NAPM)
  • Mallika, Maati, Uttarakhand
  • Meena Saraswathi Seshu, SANGRAM, Sangli
  • GRAMEENA MAHILA Okkutta, Karnataka
  • WinG Assam
  • Arati Chokshi, PUCL, Bangalore.
  • Action India, Delhi
  • Majlis Law, Legal Services for Women, Mumbai
  • Sahiayar (Stree Sangathan), Vadodara, Gujarat
  • Vasanth Kannabiran (NAWO, AP) Asmita
  • Sheba George, SAHRWARU
  • SAMYAK, Pune
  • Shabana Kazi, VAMP
  • Sruti disAbility Rights Centre, Kolkata
  • Forum to Engage Men (FEM), New Delhi
  • MASVAW( Men Action for stopping Violence Against Women), UP
  • Breakthrough, New Delhi
  • V Rukmini Rao, Gramya Resource Centre for Women, Secunderabad
  • LABIA, a queer feminist LBT collective, Mumbai
  • Law Trust, Tamil Nadu
  • Men’s Action to Stop Violence agaisnt Women (MASVAW), UP
  • National Forum for Single Women’s Rights
  • NAWO-AP, Arunachal Pradesh Women’s Welfare Society (APWWS)
  • Indigenous Women’s Resource Centre (IWRC)
  • New Socialist Initiative, Delhi
  • Gabriele Dietrich, Pennurimai Iyakkam
  • Sangat, a South Asian Feminist Network
  • Stree Mukti Sanghatana, Mumbai
  • SWATI, Ahmedabad
  • Tamil Nadu Women Fish Workers Forum
  • Subhash Mendhapurkar,SUTRA, H.P.
  • Mario, Nigah, queer collective, New Delhi
  • Sushma Varma, Samanatha Mahila Vedike, Bangalore
  • Priti Darooka, PWESCR (The Programme on Women’s Economic,Social and Cultural Rights), New Delhi
  • Pushpa Achanta (WSS, Karnataka)
  • AWN, Kabul
  • AZAD and Sakha Team, Delhi
  • Ekta, Madurai
  • Empower People
  • Vrinda Grover
  • Chayanika Shah, Bombay
  • Aruna Roy
  • Kalyani Menon-Sen, Feminist Learning Partnerships, Gurgaon
  • Nandini Rao
  • Pratiksha Baxi
  • Amrita Nandy
  • Farah Naqvi, Writer & Activist, Delhi
  • Nivedita Menon
  • Urvashi Butalia
  • Kaveri R I, Bengaluru
  • Dunu Roy
  • Harsh Mander
  • Anil TV
  • Laxmi Murthy, Journalist, Bangalore
  • Rahul Roy
  • Rituparna Borah, queer feminist activist
  • Ranjana Padhi, New Delhi
  • Trupti Shah, Vadodara, Gujarat
  • Vasanth Kannabiran
  • Sudha Bharadwaj
  • Veena Shatrugna,  Hyderabad
  • Kamayani Bali Mahabal
  • Kiran Shaheen, Journalist and activist
  • Lesley A Esteves, journalist, New Delhi
  • devangana kalita, assam
  • Aruna Burte
  • Anita Ghai
  • Mohan Rao, New Delhi
  • Rakhi Sehgal, New Delhi
  • Geetha Nambisan
  • Charan Singh, New Delhi
  • Manjima Bhattacharjya
  • Jinee Lokaneeta,Associate professor, Drew University, Madison, NJ
  • Kavita Panjabi, Jadavpur University, Kolkata
  • Albertina almeida, Goa
  • Satyajit Rath, New Delhi
  • Prerna Sud, New Delhi
  • Priya Sen, New Delhi
  • Aarthi Pai, Bangalore
  • Kalpana Vishwanath, Gurgaon
  • Aisha K. Gill, Reader, University of Roehampton, London
  • Ammu Abraham, Mumbai
  • Anagha Sarpotdar, Activist and PhD Student, Mumbai
  • Anand Pawar
  • Anuradha Marwah, Ajmer Adult Education Association (AAEA), Ajmer
  • Asha Ramesh, activist/researcher/consultant
  • Bondita
  • Gauri Gill, New delhi
  • Sophia Khan, Gujarat
  • Niranjani Iyer, Chennai
  • Dyuti Ailawadi
  • Gandimathi Alagar
  • Gayatri Buragohain – Feminist Approach to Technology (FAT), New Delhi
  • Geetha Nambisan, Delhi
  • Sadhna Arya, New Delhi
  • Vineeta Bal, New Delhi
  • Suneeta Dhar
  • Geeta Ramaseshan, Advocate, Chennai
  • Sonal Sharma, New delhi
  • Anusha Hariharan, Delhi/Chennai
  • Jayasree.A.K,
  • Gautam Bhan, New Delhi
  • Jayasree Subramanian, TISS,Hyderabad
  • Jhuma Sen, Advocate, Supreme Court
  • Teena Gill, New Delhi
  • Kannamma Raman
  • Karuna D W
  • Kavita Panjabi
  • Shalini Krishan, New Delhi
  • Lalita Ramdas, Secunderabad
  • Manasi Pingle
  • Madhumita Dutta, Chennai, Tamil Nadu
  • Manoj Mitta
  • Pamela Philipose
  • Parul Chaudhary
  • Preethi Herman
  • Sunil Gupta, New Delhi
  • Radha Khan
  • Rama Vedula
  • Rebecca John
  • Renu Khanna, SAHAJ
  • Rohini Hensman (Writer and Activist, Bombay)
  • Rohit Prajapati, Environmental activist, Gujarat
  • Roshmi Goswami
  • Shipra Nigam, Consultant Economist, Research and Information Systems, New Delhi
  • Shipra Deo, Agribusiness Systems International Vamshakti, Pratapgarh
  • Rukmini Datta
  • Sridala Swami
  • Sarba Raj Khadka, Kathmandu
  • Satish K. Singh, CHSJ
  • Shinkai Karokhail, from the Afghanistan Parliament
  • Sima Samar, Kabul
  • Smita Singh, FTII, Pune
  • Subhalakshmi Nandi
  • Sujata Gothoskar
  • Swar Thounaojam
  • Inayat Sabhikhi
  • Jaya Vindhyala, Hyderabad

 

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So what about ‘RAPIST’ HIP HOP? #honeysingh #vaw

Honey Singh’s brazenly pornographic and abusive anti-women songs glorifying rape and violence against women has evoked little protest

Hardnews Bureau Delhi

Raat ko nikali naari 

hui gadi pe savaari 

par voh raat usko pad gayi bhari. 

Peeche se aaya main 

utari uski saari 

kachchi phadi 

lungi gaadi 

aur g***d maari. 

Kyunki main………. 

Kyunki main………. 

Kyunki main hoon ek balatkari 

Kyunki main………. 

Kyunki main………. 

Kyunki main hoon balatkari

These lyrics are infamously integral to an equally infamous song by popular Punjabi hip hop star Yo Yo Honey Singh who has attained a cult status in recent times, especially among drunken men and youngsters blasting his music inside swanky cars in Delhi and other cities of north India. Such is his popularity that his songs are repeatedly being played by radio stations (not the above song), Bollywood producers are queuing outside his office, Anyurag Kashyap plans to make a movie about him and many prominent nightclubs play his vulgar, offensive and disgusting songs laced with crude masculine profanities and sexist abuse and violence directed at women.

Hence, while thousands of young girls and boys in Delhi and all over India are protesting against the brutal gang rape of a 23-year-old girl in Delhi, many others are dancing on the tunes of this new obscene king of Indian hip hop music celebrating his highly obscene and anti-women ‘Jat machismo’.

Recently, his pictures were splashed across prominent newspapers inviting readers to join him at this year’s New Year bash in a big ticket show. His shows are often sold out. And though his lyrics are primarily in Punjabi, his appeal transcends linguistic and class boundaries.

His ardent supporters say that he represents their filthy fantasies and speaks their language since his profanities are directed at allegedly women who have either cheated on their boyfriends or dumped them. Indeed, this could be yet another chauvinist construct or a figment of perverse male imagination 

Incidentally, Honey Singh tops 2012 Youtube views. He also has several pages on facebook dedicated to him. Surprisingly, many women fans are happy to declare that they are his hardcore supporters. Overall, he has close to 16 lakh fans on the social networking platform. Pictures of celebrities proudly posing with Singh are posted on his fan pages. Following the big picture high moral ground ‘marketing trend’, some of them perhaps have come out openly against the rape as well.

His ardent supporters say that he represents their filthy fantasies and speaks their language since his profanities are directed at allegedly women who have either cheated on their boyfriends or dumped them. Indeed, this could be yet another chauvinist construct or a figment of perverse male imagination. Walk through the posh by lanes of South and West Delhi in Delhi, especially in the night, and you can hear one of his particularly most vulgar and repulsive songs (ch….) being played again and again in full blast, especially when girls are around.

The compulsive choice of such perverse songs instigating sex violence against women and glorifying their physical and mental degradation clearly reflects the mindset of these youngsters. The sick irony is that some of them might be present at these protest sites in Delhi ogling at women, even signing self righteous petitions or holding feminist placards.

It may sound strange, but there have been no mention of these filthy songs degrading women, literally glorifying sexual assault and rape, in the mainstream media. Civil society and women’s groups have ignored their crudely misogynistic content. The media largely choose to write eulogies on this third rate, cheap and desperately morbid hip hop star, how he has gained a cult status and made hip hop popular in India.

The compulsive choice of such perverse songs instigating sex violence against women and glorifying their physical and mental degradation clearly reflects the mindset of these youngsters. The sick irony is that some of them might be present at these protest sites in Delhi ogling at women, even signing self righteous petitions or holding feminist placards

Says an activist, “There have been very few protests on his brazenly pornographic lyrics or demands to ban his songs or put him behind bars. Once he is punished, will he be able to yet again proclaim so proudly that he is a balatkaari and will the celebrities and media still chase him? (rapist).

 

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India signing nuclear test ban treaty to kick-start talks with Japan?

TOKYO/ NEW DELHI: It may not be necessary for India to sign Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty(CTBT) for resumption of talks with Japan for peaceful use of nuclear energy but it will certainly help if any such bilateral agreement can weave in New Delhi’s commitment to ban on nuclear test. Top diplomatic sources here told TOI that merely a generic voluntary moratorium on carrying out nuclear tests, which India keeps reiterating, will not be of much help.

The talks for civilian nuclear cooperation between the two countries have remained suspended since the Fukushima nuclear meltdown in March, 2011. In a recent interaction with outgoing Japanese PMYoshihiko Noda in Cambodia, PM Manmohan Singh had raised the issue of nuclear cooperation with Tokyo, but there is still no commitment from Japan exactly when talks will restart.

“Japan is not insisting that India sign CTBT but it is my reading that if India can commit to a test ban in any bilateral agreement for such a cooperation between the two countries, it will certainly make things easier,” a top diplomatic source handling Japan’s non-proliferation policy told TOI. The official was talking on the sidelines of the Fukushima ministerial conference that discussed measures to enhance nuclear safety worldwide, apart from showcasing Japan’s efforts to cope up with the nuclear disaster.

The official added though that Japan was not imposing any pre-conditions for resumption of nuclear dialogue. Indian officials here said though that it was not possible for New Delhi to go any further than what New Delhi had committed to before Nuclear Suppliers Group(NSG) in September, 2008, where got India a waiver to carry out nuclear commerce. Then foreign minister Pranab Mukherjee had said in a statement that India remained committed to a voluntary and unilateral moratorium on nuclear test and to negotiate a Fissile Material Cutoff Treaty (FMCT).

India is hoping that the Liberal Democratic Party chief and the incoming PM, Shinzo Abe, will work towards resumption of talks. Abe shunned the policy of doing away completely with nuclear power and yet managed an emphatic win in the recent Lower House elections. After his victory, Abe has suggested that he will reconsider Japan’s ban on construction of new nuclear reactors in the country. Abe had earlier described the Noda-led government’s call for zero-dependence on nuclear energy as “unrealistic and irresponsible”.

 

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#DelhiGangrape: Section 144 deployed in New Delhi district #WTFnews

PTI
New Delhi, December 23, 2012
 
First Published: 07:41 IST(23/12/2012)
Last Updated: 07:49 IST(23/12/2012)

In an early morning action on Saturday, the police removed all protesters from Vijay Chowk and were taken to an undisclosed location by a bus, media reports said.

The Delhi police is on high alert and Section 144 has been deployed in the New Delhi district, reports said. Reports said that heavy security has been deployed in and around India Gate and Vijay Chowk.

However, the media is not being allowed in and around Vijay Chowk, TV reports said.

A number of protesters who stay put at Raisina Hill to protest the gangrape of a young girl were evacuated on early Sunday morning.

The protesters, who spend a chilly night in the open after they fought pitched battle with police throughout the day on Saturday, were taken into a bus by police.

Police had also picked up protesters from outside Congress chief Sonia Gandhi‘s 10, Janpath residence in the wee hours today.

In a surprise move, Gandhi had came out of her residence and met protesters late last night.

According to a protester, Gandhi told them “I am with you. I can’t tell when the justice will be delivered, but surely it will be. We will do something.”

The protesters when asked for a deadline, she said, “I can’t give you a deadline but action will be taken.”

The detentions came as part of a police plan to contain protest near Raisina Hill, the seat of power.

Four metro stations near India Gate and Raisina Hill have already been closed from this morning till further orders.

The stations which remained closed were Patel Chowk, Central Secretariat, Udyog Bhavan and Race Course.

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#India- More shame: 3-year-old girl raped in playschool #Delhirape #Vaw

Within hours after the gruesome gangrape of a 23-year-old came to light, a three-and-a-half-year-old girl was drugged and raped inside the bathroom of a playschool. The horrific crime was committed by the playschool owner’s husband. The shocking incident took place on Monday morning in southwest Delhi’s Vashisht Park area. The traumatized girl has told a city court that two-three more girls were abused along with her. 

The police have arrested the accused, Pramod Malik, who holds a senior rank in an autonomous research institute.https://i0.wp.com/www.hindustantimes.com/Images/Popup/2012/12/21_12_12-metro11.jpg?w=520

The minor girl has gone into a state of shock after the incident.

“My daughter told the police and the magistrate that Malik drugged and raped her friends as well in a bathroom on Monday morning,” said the mother of the girl outside Nirmal Chhaya observation home, where the victim is being given counseling to help her overcome the trauma.

The girl had been attending Pathshala play school — located around hundred meters away from their house — for the last one-and-a-half years.

The girl’s grandmother said the girl looked “sad and drowsy” when she returned from the playschool on Monday.

“She did not talk much with us and slept for the entire day. In the evening, she started vomiting. We rushed her to a nearby clinic but the doctor asked us to take her to a police station, saying it was a police case. I got worried and asked her if anything wrong had happened with her. She complained about pain in her private parts and told us that Malik had forced her to consume a tablet,” the girl’s grandmother said in a choking voice.

“We took her to the Sagarpur police station. Her medical examination confirmed sexual abuse,” she said.

The minor was later taken to the station to identify the accused and started “crying and screaming” the moment she saw Malik, her grandmother said.

The incident is among the eight cases of rape reported in the city between Sunday and Thursday. The other cases were reported from Sonia Vihar, New Friends Colony, Kalkaji, Turkman Gate, New Ashok Nagar, among other areas.

 

 

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#India-126753 stood trial for #Rape in 2011, 5724 were convicted #Vaw

INDIA, Posted on Dec 19, 2012

New Delhi: Women’s rights activists and judicial experts have long demanded fast-track court processes and quick convictions in cases of rape to tackle the problem. Their demand seems justified in the light of the National Crime Records Bureau (NCRB) data for the year 2011.

The total number of persons under arrest including those from previous year in 2011 were 37929 of whom, 2050 people or 5.4 per cent were released before trial. In all, 26436 persons were chargesheeted, a 69.7 per cent figure against the total number of arrests. About 9443 persons were still under investigation at the end of the year, i.e 24.9 per cent.

In the same year, the total number of persons under trial including those from previous year stood at 126753 but only 21489 trials were completed (a one-sixth conversion rate). In all, 5724 people were convicted which stood at 26.6 per cent when weighed against those who stood trial. The total number of pending cases stood at 104997, 82.8 per cent of those which went to trial.

This surely paints a bleak picture about our slow judicial processed and also indicts the police for shoddy investigation which is evident from the dismal conviction rate.

Fast track courts which can convene for daily hearings and exemplary punishment are urgently required to tackle both the mountain of pending cases and to get a grip on the rising number of instances of crime against women.

 

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