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US Research says Atheists ‘have higher IQs’

  Their intelligence ‘makes them more likely to dismiss religion as irrational and unscientific’
  • Research found those with higher IQs more likely to dismiss religion
  • Another drawback to being religious, or at least Christian is losing out on top jobs

By DANIEL BATES

PUBLISHED: 22:52 GMT, 16 August 2013 | 

Atheists tend to be more intelligent than religious people, according to a US study.

Researchers found that those with high IQs had greater self-control and were able to do more for themselves – so did not need the benefits that religion provides.

They also have better self esteem and built more supportive relationships, the study authors said.

 

The conclusions were the result of a review of 63 scientific studies about religion and intelligence dating between 1928 and last year.

In 53 of these there was a ‘reliable negative relation between intelligence and religiosity’.

In just 10 was that relationship positive.

 

Even among children, the more intelligent a child was the more probable it was that they would shun the church.

In old age the same trend persisted as well, the research showed.

The University of Rochester psychologists behind the study defined religion as involvement in some or all parts of a belief.

They defined intelligence as the ‘ability to reason, plan, solve problems, think abstractly, comprehend complex ideas, learn quickly, and learn from experience’.

In their conclusions, they said: ‘Most extant explanations (of a negative relation) share one central theme – the premise that religious beliefs are irrational, not anchored in science, not testable and, therefore, unappealing to intelligent people who ‘know better’.

Intelligent people typically spend more time in school – a form of self-regulation that may yield long-term benefits.

‘More intelligent people getting higher level jobs and better employment and higher salary may lead to higher self-esteem, and encourage personal control beliefs.’

Study co-author Jordan Silberman, a graduate student of neuroeconomics at the University of Rochester, said: ‘Intelligence may lead to greater self-control ability, self-esteem, perceived control over life events, and supportive relationships, obviating some of the benefits that religion sometimes provides.’

 

Research from the UK last week showed another drawback to being religious, or at least Christian – you lose out in the race for top jobs.

Official figures show nearly one in four people who have no religious belief now live in homes headed by someone with a senior executive job or a place in one of the professions.

But well under a fifth of Christians are employed in the best-paid and most influential jobs or are married to someone who is, according to the Office for National Statistics (ONS).

The last census, carried out in March 2011, showed a fall in the number of people that call themselves Christian in the UK.

Christian numbers in England and Wales, including children, fell by 4.1 million in a decade to 33.2 million.

However there was a 45 per cent rise over the same 10 years in numbers who say they have no religion, to 14.1 million.

Read more here http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2395972/Atheists-higher-IQs-Their-intelligence-makes-likely-dismiss-religion-irrational-unscientific.html

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#India – Cost of cancer treatment could drop to Rs 1,000 a month #goodnews #Health


Author(s):
Akshay Deshmane
Issue Date:
2013-6-7

Tata Memorial Hospital’s preliminary studies of combination therapy prove successful; clinical trials to begin soon

Treatment for cancer may become far more affordable and cost less than Rs 1,000 per month in coming years, if an ongoing research project at the Tata Memorial Hospital in Mumbai is successful. The treatment currently being researched combines low dosage metronomic therapy—administration of chemotherapy at low, minimally toxic doses every day –with drug repositioning, which is the use of low cost drugs usually administered for ailments other than cancer.

The treatment of the commonest form of cancer in India – head and neck cancer– usually costs between Rs. 15,000-20,000 a month. With the new form of drug therapy, a patient’s cost of treatment could be reduced to as low as Rs 500 per month, or even Rs 250 per month if the treatment is carried out at the Tata Memorial Hospital.

Testing efficacy

A review of the preliminary studies of the method which proved successful was published in the May issue of British medical journal Lancet. Researchers are now set to begin randomised clinical trials of the combined approach of treatment on patients with head and neck cancers from next month. Confirming the development, Shripad Banavali, head of medical oncology department at Tata Memorial Hospital, said the institutional review board of the hospital has recently given clearance to begin randomised trials on patients suffering from head and neck cancer.

“More than 400 patients suffering from head and neck cancer will undergo randomised trials over three years at the hospital, beginning next month. We are starting with this (type of cancer) as it is the commonest cancer in India. Once we conduct these trials, we will have conclusive evidence about the effectiveness of the therapy,” said Banavali.

The drugs Celicoxib and Methotrexate, usually used as anti-inflammatory drugs, are also considered useful in treating head and neck cancer. Low chemotherapy doses of these drugs will be administered on patients and their effects studied closely to gauge efficacy.

Drug repositioning

The current method of treatment of cancer is called maximum tolerated dose therapy. This involves administering heavy doses which target the tumour every three or four weeks. A gap between two doses is maintained to ensure that the patient has enough time to recover from the overwhelming effects of the treatment. This treatment, however, is very expensive and not widely available. In metronomic therapy, daily low doses are administered not only on the patient’s tumour but also in areas surrounding the tumour; the blood supply is cut off and resistance power of the body is increased.

The drug discovery system followed in the West involves making new inventions and discoveries for the treatment of ailments. However, this method does not solve the problem of affordability and access to treatment in most of those suffering from ailments. In our context, we need to follow drug re-positioning method, says Banavali.

“We use drugs which are already there in the market for treatment. Also, our effort is to ensure that the drugs are among those included in the World Health Organisation’s Essential Drugs list as they are not only cheap but affordable and available the world over,” adds Banavali.


 

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Attn- Apply now vacancies at FAT #womenrights

Feminist Approach to Technology (FAT)

Vacancies at FAT

If you have a research background, like to work with young girls, have interest in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics, this position is for you! We have the following 2 vacancies to fill urgently.
Program Assistant
The Program Assistant’s main role would be to assist the Program Coordinator and the Program Associate. S/he will be assisting the Program Coordinator – School Contact Program with the research as all as in organizing all workshops and events. S/he will be responsible for all logistical tasks for School Contact Program and all multimedia documentation for both the School Contact Program and the Tech Center Program. Click here for detailed announcement.
Program Coordinator
The Program Coordinator – School Contact Program is responsible for developing and managing FAT’s school contact program, including finances, planning, monitoring and evaluation. S/he will be directly responsible for all components of the school contact program and will be supervising the tech center program associate in running the tech center. S/he should be able to build partnerships, coalitions and collaborations with organizations working in the sector on similar issues. Working closely with the rest of the team, volunteers and board members, s/he will also be responsible for identifying donors to take forward the school contact program and any research needed to be done to facilitate the school contact program. S/he will be responsible for timely submissions of proposals and reports, and develop public communication systems of the program. Click here for detailed announcement.
Last date for application for both the positions is 28th Feb 2013. Send us the following to [email protected].
  1. Full Curriculum Vitae and a letter of intent;
  2. Names and contact details for three references.

Apply now to be a part of the FAT Team!

 

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Free Online Harvard School of Public Health Course on Clinical Research

This year  Swati Piramal was elected to the Harvard Board
of Overseers, a 350 year old governing board of Harvard University
for a term of 6 years. She has been frequently asked how that would
benefit her own country. She wanted to bring the best of Harvard to
India and as a first step has ensured the initiation of a Free Online
Course on Clinical Research.

 

One of the big shortages we have in Indian science is the lack of
research curriculum in our medical training. India has over 900,000
doctors but few are trained to be physician scientists. This is a
glaring gap in our country. Medical doctors trained in the science of
quantitative methods can become top professionals in clinical research
and become investigators for trials. Some months ago, Swati mooted the
idea of training for doctors in research methods to the Harvard School
of Public Health and was pleased that they responded with the first
ever Edx course in Clinical research  which is online training in
Quantitative Methods in Clinical and Public Health Research.
This course has got a huge worldwide response, with over 10,000 people
already registered.  Swati’s personal goal is to enroll at least 2000
doctors /health professionals/ students interested in research, from
India for this introductory course, which is free. The faculty is
world class and have made a great contribution to global health.

Please get as many people to enroll as possible. Share this  with
others who may be interested in clinical research. Please help to
circulate to faculty/ students and others interested in research.

Free Online Harvard School of Public Health Course on Clinical
Research Premieres in October for a Global Audience

To learn more about the free, three-month online course and to sign
up, go to the following web address:
https://www.edx.org/courses/HarvardX/PH207x/2012_Fall/about

How to register.

Anyone can register for this course at the following address.

https://www.edx.org/courses/HarvardX/PH207x/2012_Fall/about

The Course Number is  PH207x

Classes Start Oct 15, 2012

Classes End Jan 18, 2013

People interested in taking the course should estimate that it will
require about 10 hours per week of effort.

About the Faculty

The course is taught by two well respected Harvard School of Public
Health professors, Earl Francis Cook and Marcello Pagano.

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United States Private-Sector Physicians and Pharmaceutical Contract Research

 

Clinical trials 06

Background

There have been dramatic increases over the past 20 years in the number of nonacademic, private-sector physicians who serve as principal investigators on US clinical trials sponsored by the pharmaceutical industry. However, there has been little research on the implications of these investigators’ role in clinical investigation. Our objective was to study private-sector clinics involved in US pharmaceutical clinical trials to understand the contract research arrangements supporting drug development, and specifically how private-sector physicians engaged in contract research describe their professional identities.

Methods and Findings

We conducted a qualitative study in 2003–2004 combining observation at 25 private-sector research organizations in the southwestern United States and 63 semi-structured interviews with physicians, research staff, and research participants at those clinics. We used grounded theory to analyze and interpret our data. The 11 private-sector physicians who participated in our study reported becoming principal investigators on industry clinical trials primarily because contract research provides an additional revenue stream. The physicians reported that they saw themselves as trial practitioners and as businesspeople rather than as scientists or researchers.

Conclusions

Our findings suggest that in addition to having financial motivation to participate in contract research, these US private-sector physicians have a professional identity aligned with an industry-based approach to research ethics. The generalizability of these findings and whether they have changed in the intervening years should be addressed in future studies.

Please see later in the article for the Editors‘ Summary.

 

Citation: Fisher JA, Kalbaugh CA (2012) United States Priv

Read full study here

 

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